NO MORE Super Bowl Ad: 4 Tips For Speaking Out Against Domestic Violence

NO MORE's four tips for speaking out against domestic violence and sexual assault during Super Bowl XLIX on Sunday.
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Photo by NOMORE.org

NO MORE — a non-profit umbrella organization devoted to raising awareness about domestic violence — just unveiled the powerful PSA (watch below) set to air during Super Bowl XLIX on Sunday, and now they want you to know how you can speak up about this important issue and provide help to friends, family and loved ones affected by domestic violence or sexual assault.

Tip #1: “Start a conversation by telling your friends that 1 in 3 women and 1 in 7 men have experienced domestic violence, and 1 in 5 women and 1 in 16 men have experienced sexual assault at some point in their lifetime,” NO MORE says. “This is a great way to get the point across that these issues are serious and that many people we love have been affected by domestic and sexual violence. (If your friends want to read more about these statistics, you can point them here: Avon’s 2013 NO MORE Study)”

Tip #2: “Speak up when you hear offensive comments that degrade women, men, or victims of abuse,” NO MORE continues. “Hey, it’s a Super Bowl party — there’s a good chance that someone is going to make some inappropriate remarks. The best thing you can do is speak up and tell them that you’re not comfortable with that kind of talk. Simply doing that can help your friends understand that it’s not cool for them or anyone to degrade a person.”

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Tip #3: “If someone you know discloses that they are experiencing abuse now or have in the past, remember this could be the first time they’re telling someone,” NO MORE advises. “Reassure them that you believe them and that the abuse was not their fault. The most important thing you can do in this moment is listen and support them. Most of all, make sure to be patient, non-judgmental, and respectful of their decisions. Ask them if they’d like to talk to a professional counselor, and offer to sit with them while they call a national or local hotline.”

Tip #4: “Make sure that your friends know whom to call to get help,” NO MORE says. “For immediate help, call 911. National Domestic Violence Hotline:
1-800-799-SAFE (7233). National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-656-HOPE (4673). Teen Dating Violence Hotline: 1-866-3‌31-9‌474 or text ‘loveis’ to 22522.”