For those who have to dress up for business, however, carrying these items can prove problematic. Everyday carry is often limited to what’s in your wallet, but, fortunately, there are numerous products to address this limitation. For example, cutting options range from a heavy-duty, single-edge razorblade to a custom knife fabricated from tool steel and titanium. Other useful items can be carried unobtrusively on a neck lanyard, and a money clip offers another way to carry a variety of crisis gear tools to help you thrive and survive in the most unexpected situations.

Emergency First Aid

Bandages weigh next to nothing, quickly stop the bleeding from minor wounds and are particularly useful when trying to complete a task requiring neatness, such as rendering first aid to others or working with maps. I’ve carried them in my wallet for years. Band-Aid and Nexcare have expanded their product offerings, so you’ll have to test a few types of bandage to evaluate which suits your purpose. Wear them for a day or two to determine if they have the features you need. I’ve heard users complain about weak adhesive, causing the bandage to fall off in the shower or when the user sweats. Others tell of powerful adhesive that pulls the skin off upon removal. Some of the waterproof bandages get my vote; I’ve wrapped them around my fingers while rock climbing, and they stay on. In a pinch, you can also use a bandage to stick a note to a windshield if you don’t have any tape handy.

SOG Access Card 2.0

This SOG Access
Card 2.0 is a lifesaving
money-holder that also
features a 2.75-inch locking blade of VG-10 steel and a handle with three finger grooves.

Signal Mirror

A signal mirror can be bought or made. Acrylic or polycarbonate mirrors the size of a credit card are available online. Or you can fabricate a signal mirror from stainless steel. Choose a thickness, cut it to size, drill a small hole in the center for sighting, radius the corners and polish one side. A mirror is also invaluable for locating foreign objects in your eye and extracting them.

Pocket Knives

A partnership between custom knife designer John Kubasek and Boker produced the ultra-compact Boker Plus Credit Card Knife. The serviceable, rectangular knife features 440C stainless steel, a 2.25-inch blade, a titanium liner and weighs only 1.1 ounces. The Kubasek-designed blade carries an MSRP of $37.95.

The Cardsharp was designed and developed by Iain Sinclair, an English knife designer and inventor. While the card folds to form the knife’s handle, a safety button prevents the knife from opening accidentally when not in use. The 420 stainless steel blade can cut through a seatbelt, and at 0.08 inches thick, the knife is one of the thinnest currently on the market. Available in a variety of configurations, the Cardsharp 2.2 retails for $33, the Cardsharp 3 for $16, and the Cardsharp 4 for $90.

RELATED: Crisis Gear Essentials For Your Bug-Out Bag

Kubasek Custom Knives makes the Creditor II, a rectangular folder that pivots on a large grommet and can be opened and closed with one hand. The locking blade is a laminate crafted from D2 tool steel and carbon fiber. The
handle is 6AL4V titanium. A clip is available for carrying the knife attached to clothing or for use as a money clip. The Kubasek Creditor II weighs 1.5 ounces, features a 2.25-inch blade and retails for $185.

SOG’s Access Card 2.0 features a 2.75-inch locking blade of VG10 stainless steel. It weighs 1.8 ounces and features a rugged matte black finish. A clip enables carrying the knife attached to clothing or for use as a money clip. The SOG Access Card 2.0 has an suggested retail price of $107.

cardsharp

The new simplified and improved three part construction incorporates a robust Zytel® child-proof safety lock built into the single piece medical grade Borealis™ polypropylene body (living hinges guaranteed for life) . The addition of a snap-fit blade lock also gives the knife excellent rigidity in both open and closed positions.

Micro Flashlight

Iain Sinclair also makes ultra-thin LED flashlights. Each flashlight contains a pre-charged lithium-ion battery with a three-year shelf life. The Flashcard3 provides 50 lumens, weighs 0.63 ounces and retails for $8.. The aluminum-bodied Eon Extreme 2 provides 300 lumens, weighs 1.5 ounces and retails for $66.

Worley Lightworx makes the FlatLight, an inexpensive, LED light that lasts up to 10 hours. About the size of a credit card, the FlatLight is available on Amazon for $4.99.

RELATED: 10 SureFire Survival Flashlights

More Survival Gear

Tool Logic makes two credit-card-sized survival kits. Both contain a knife with a serrated, AUS-8 stainless steel blade, a magnesium fire-starter, an emergency whistle, tweezers and a toothpick. The 1.3-ounce SVC 1 features a compass and 8x-power lens. Meanwhile, the 1.4-ounce SVC 2 features a red LED flashlight. Both cards carry an MSRP of $25.75.

Another important addition to any everyday carry kit is an information card. A vital information card that includes phone numbers and emergency instructions is useful when personal electronics fail. Laminating the card will make it waterproof and durable.

Similarly, safety pins weigh little and can be carried on a key ring unobtrusively during your daily routine. They can temporarily repair torn clothing, replace a broken or lost button or a zipper pull, close a broken zipper or act as a toothpick. Safety pins can also attach a compass to your clothing for ease of use. They can link items, remove a splinter, thorn or cactus spine, or stick a note to a tree. By pinning a sleeve cuff to the opposite arm, they can also help make a hasty sling. In a worst-case scenario, safety pins can also act as sutures.

Editor’s Note: Check state statutes regarding the maximum knife blade length allowed where you reside. Remember to remove all knives before flying commercially.

For More Information

Boker
boker.de/us; 800-835-6433

Iain Sinclair
iainsinclair.com

Kubasek Custom Knives
kubasekcustomknives.com

SOG
sogknives.com; 425-771-6230

Tool Logic (SOG)
toollogic.com; 888-405-6433

Worley LightWorx
worleylightworx.com

This article was originally published in the SURVIVOR’S EDGE ™  Spring 2015 issue. Subscription is available in print and digital editions here.