In general, preppers don’t typically care what others think about their efforts to stay safe. Friends, relatives, coworkers and even the cashiers that joke about you buying too much toilet paper all make you want to keep your mouth shut about what you’re doing.

I get it, and I’m sure an economic collapse, war or the Yellowstone eruption are much bigger concerns for you than your coworker’s remarks during coffee breaks. But today I want to make a case for prepping with family because, as you’re about to see, their fate is your fate. Here’s what I mean by that: Your spouse and your kids, maybe even your father, live under the same roof with you and, in most catastrophic events, you’re all going to be in the same boat.

If you’re going to bug-in, then you’re stuck with them for as long as it takes for things to get back to “normal”. This means you’re going to have to share your food with them and you’re all going to have to work as a team to get through the ordeal. You’re going to have to find ways to reach external sources of food, water and other resources.

prepper, preppers, prepping, prepper tips, preppers tips and techniques, prepper techniques, prepper help, doomsday preppers, doomsday prepper, prepper products

On the contrary, if you need to bug-out and run from impending disaster, I can assure you that you won’t have the heart to leave them behind. If your wife freezes or starts screaming in disbelief, if your kid won’t run away without Milo, the dog that’s hiding under the bed, you’ll have no choice but to stay behind and try to get everyone out.

RELATED STORY: 5 Silly Prepping Mistakes You Need to Stop Making

Of course, if they all knew what they have to do in an emergency, things will be much easier for you when it finally happens. Once they understand danger, instead of panicking they’ll have the instinct to run away as fast as possible. They’re level of skill and training could literally make the difference between life and death.

The question is, can you really get the people living under the same roof as you to start prepping?

prepper, preppers, prepping, prepper tips, preppers tips and techniques, prepper techniques, prepper help, doomsday preppers, doomsday prepper, prepper outdoors

The only plausible scenario when it’s best not to get them involved is when you’re not getting along with them. Constant arguments, fighting in front of the children and money issues never get you anywhere, and they just drain you of energy. After all, we’re human beings and the more we fight with someone, the more we tend to be against them no matter what they say.

RELATED STORY: Prepper Fitness – 8 Ways to Fuel Your Survival

In such cases, you’re either going to have to be a lot more discreet with your prepping or just ignore them and mind your own business. Your spouse constantly nagging you is a worthwhile trade-off for having the peace of mind that you’re ready for anything. Besides, once a small-scale disaster happens to someone you know (such as a house fire or a car crash), your spouse will rush to join you.

Another good reason not to include your loved ones in your plan is if they don’t believe something bad is going to happen. After talking a few times with them, you’ll know whether they have the right mindset or not. If they don’t seem eager to do this, start prepping alone but don’t give up on them. Your efforts to prepare and those getting them to join your cause can work in unison.

prepper, preppers, prepping, prepper tips, preppers tips and techniques, prepper techniques, prepper help, doomsday preppers, doomsday prepper, prepper gear

If they’re not sure prepping is worthwhile, let them see you in action and, at some point, you’re going to listen in awe as they ask you about bug-out bags, knives and canned goods.

RELATED STORY: 15 New Prepper Products

See, when you transform yourself into an action-taker, you’ll be leading by example and you’re much more likely to convince them. The key here is to avoid looking crazy and show them you’re just prepping for things that are more believable, such as extended power outages, snow storms, a job loss and so on.

Trying to get your family to prep with you is a definite “Yes,” but don’t wait up for them. If they’re against this, if you have a hard time convincing them, then you should just start on your own and let the chips fall where they may.

From Our Partners