Save Yourself in the Wilderness

Wilderness Medical Associates International courses teach people how to handle injuries when help isn't on the way.
Wilderness first aid
Wilderness Medical Associates International trains people to handle injuries in emergency situations.|Photo by iStock

When you venture off the beaten path, a twisted ankle or a broken leg is exponentially more severe than if it happened at the local softball field. If you don’t have the means to call for help, you need to be able to handle any serious injuries on your own.

Wilderness Medical Associates International trains people for emergency situations. The core of the curriculum provides students with the skills and insight needed to improvise, adapt and exercise reasonable judgment at any level of medical training.

The two most popular courses are a two-day First Aid course for people taking short, remote trips. The Wilderness First Responder is a more in-depth course popular with guides, rescue teams and outdoor professionals.It is offered in five-, seven- and eight-day formats and covers everything from wound management and CPR to patient assessment for altitude illness, hypothermia and heat illness.

Mountains, deserts and oceans are the obvious places where this training may be applied, but it is actually effective in settings where access to care is delayed or impossible. “The environment can make an existing problem worse,” explained Medical Director David Johnson, “It can make new problems more complicated.” That twisted ankle on a hiking trip 10 miles from the nearest town or in a place where a disaster has occurred complicates a relatively minor injury.

Taking a course from Wilderness Medical Associates International and becoming certified means you are better prepared for whatever adventure or misadventure comes your way. For more information, visit or call 207-730-7331.

This article was originally published in the SURVIVOR’S EDGE™ Winter 2016 edition. Subscription is available in print and digital editions here.

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