Preventing Violence After Disaster Strikes

The CDC offers tips on preventing various types of violence in post-disaster situations.
disasters, post-disaster, preventing violence, CDC
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Natural disasters can strike at any moment. It is important to make preparations to stay safe both during and after a disaster. According to FEMA, stressors like lack of food, shelter and lost family can incite violent behavior, which can be a threat to you and your family’s safety.

FEMA wrote:

Strategies for preventing violence after disasters should focus on providing assistance to individuals in need and developing supportive networks for managing daily tasks.

The Emergency Preparedness and Response Division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offer a variety of educational materials to help families and communities prevent violence after natural disasters. The CDC website is a hub of information on preventing things like shaken baby syndrome, sexual violence, child maltreatment and more in post-disaster situations.

For more information, visit

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