Typhoon or Hurricane? What’s the Difference?

Find out whether or not typhoons and hurricanes have meteorological differences.
typhoon, hurricane, natural disaster, disaster evacuation, disaster prep
Modern storm tracking can provide time to escape. Don’t endanger yourself by waiting until the last minute.|Photo by Reuters

With very little pomp and fanfare, we hereby formally announce that there is no meteorological difference between a typhoon and a hurricane. Hurricanes, typhoons and even cyclones are the same weather phenomenon. They are simply found in different regions. Hurricanes, for example, are found in the Atlantic and Northwest Pacific. Storms of this nature in the Northeast Pacific are called typhoons.

The foundation of these storms is the same as well; warm tropical oceans, humidity and light winds are the ingredients. This mixture can combine over time to produce violent winds, huge waves and torrential rain.

While there is no absolute rule as to when these storms may develop, history shows a pattern. The official hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30. Typhoons vary from this schedule and can occur at any time. History tells us, though, that there is a higher chance for occurrence between May and October. In the end, these identical weather phenomena share one extremely dangerous trait: unpredictability.

This article was originally published in the SURVIVOR’S EDGE™ Spring 2016 issue. Subscription is available in print and digital editions here.

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